Gunpowder and Smoke Cocktail

By Jamie Boudreau

Just as in the Cubed Old Fashioned and the old fashioned simple syrup therein, making your own ingredients takes your cocktails to the next level of flavor. In the Gunpowder and Smoke, a liqueur created using gunpowder tea infused cognac mixed with sugar provides a backbone to which all the other ingredients attach and compliment. For the smoke: a bit of flamed Scotch to top it off!

Recipe

Gunpowder and Smoke Cocktail

one egg white

2 oz Beefeater 24 Gin

1/2 oz lemon juice

1/2 oz Gunpowder Liqueur

Instructions

mix first four ingredients with cappuccino mixer or dry shake

add ice and shake

strain into a cocktail glass

flame scotch over glass using an olive oil mister

Comments
zach 15 Mar 2011
9:00 am

Hey Jamie-

In the episode, you call for 2oz of the Beefeater…however, the recipe calls for 1oz, which I presume is just a typo?  Also, do you have a specific breakdown for the components of the ‘gunpowder liqueur’?  Thanks much

Brian Dressler 15 Mar 2011
9:13 am

Thanks Zach - It has been fixed!

Chris CV 15 Mar 2011
10:00 am

Gunpowder liqueur sounds good.  What are the ratios you use for it? And do you have any other suggested uses?

Tim Glasson 15 Mar 2011
5:31 pm

I have been using egg white in cocktails for years, but my boss at my new job is telling me there’s too much risk of selmonella. What are your views? Is there any research into whether the alcohol and lemon act as curing agents, like when making carpaccio?

Joan 16 Mar 2011
3:07 pm

Jamie,
You have a unique style to your shaker method. Would you do an instructional video on exactly how you get those extra shakes? You seem to get a lot of mileage out of your style in a very short time.
Thanks,

SiMcGoram 16 Mar 2011
3:15 pm

Great video.Tim: great little article and comments on egg white here: http://4bars.com.au/web/2009/03/03/cocktails-scrambled-poached-or-shaken/

Jamie: Have you by any chance tried Smoke and Oakum’s Gunpowder Rum? It’s infused with real black powder and tobacco. Quite an incredible product. I’ve never tried gunpowder tea though. Do you really get gunpowder characteristics out of it? Why is it called gunpowder tea?

Tim Glasson 16 Mar 2011
8:20 pm

Hi Simon, thanks for that. Do you have any sources i can cite re: “unwanted bacteria… carried on the outside shell of the egg”. Perhaps you could come visit the Gold Coast and explain it to him yourself!

Jamie Boudreau 18 Mar 2011
8:51 am

Chris: The gunpowder liqueur recipe will be posted soon.

Tim: Your new boss is behind the times. Studies show that only 1 in 10,000 eggs MAY have salmonella and adding lemon and alcohol helps as well. Make sure that you are getting your eggs from a good source and you should be fine. There is a small danger, but in my many many years of using eggs, we have never received an illness. I’ve seen MANY more health related incidents with mayo than with egg white in a cocktail. If he’s still not convinced, use pasteurized egg whites.

Joan: Shaking is very personal and everyone should try to find their own style. My style is a VERY adapted version of the Japanese Hard Shake (so adapted as to be unrecognizable) and was developed to create less torque on an injured shoulder.

SiMcGoram:
Gunpowder tea is named as such because it looks like little round pellets and the English named it such as it reminded them of blackpowder grains.

Michael Meyers 26 Sep 2012
7:34 am

I really want to try this (if the truth were known, I probably just want to play with fire!). I’d still love to see the approximate ratios for the liqueur. I realize everyone may want to tweak to their tastes, but I’ve never infused anything before and I’d hate to be wasting cognac. Also, as Chris CV asked, any other suggested uses?

Thanx, in advance.

Steve Brown 22 Jan 2014
7:43 pm

What container are you using for the pressurized scotch?  And what blending instrument are you using?

Steve Brown 22 Jan 2014
7:51 pm

Ok, after cruising amazon it looks like the norpro.  I’ve used the misto and after owning it for a year it smells strongly like paint.  I’ll have to get a norpro.  Still interested in the stirring instrument, when you get the chance.

Jamie Boudreau 24 Jan 2014
6:49 pm

Steve:
Yes I use the Norpro mister and I use the Bonjour Milk Frother with the SOLID BLADE for eggs.
Happy mixing.

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