Delmonico Cocktail

By Robert Hess

The Delmonico Cocktail is named after what is considered to be the first restaurant opened in the United States. First opened in 1827, Delmonico's has suffered through fire, prohibition and a series of proprietors and still serves its famous steaks today. The eponymous cocktail is just as strong and long lived as the restaurant.

Recipe

Ingredients

1 oz gin

1/2 oz cognac

1/2 oz sweet vermouth

1/2 oz dry vermouth

dash Bitter Truth Orange Bitters

Instructions

Stir with ice.

Strain into a cocktail glass.

Garnish with orange peel.

Comments
AaronWalls 18 Oct 2011
12:06 pm

Excellent, as always, sir. I really dig that you have begun tasting and giving notes with your cocktails.

damien intoxicologist filth 23 Oct 2011
11:27 pm

great video.. is it me or did you say brandy when you were pouring the remy martin?? i know its the same thing. the only difference is the origin.,,..

damien intoxicologist filth 23 Oct 2011
11:27 pm

great video.. is it me or did you say brandy when you were pouring the remy martin?? i know its the same thing. the only difference is the origin.,,..

Allyen Wilson 21 Dec 2011
8:17 pm

Just made my first Delmonico tonight. Thanks for the instructions. It is really very good. I have not made cocktails with gin other than a martini and am now enthused to experiment further!

Robert Hess 22 Dec 2011
11:25 am

Glad you enjoyed it! Gin is a spirit that has sort of gotten a bad rap over the years. Most folks think of it as only being used in the Martini, but in fact there are hundreds of other cocktails in which it struts it stuff even better. I’ve done a LOT of gin cocktails on my show. For some drinks which illustrate some of the different faces of gin, I might recommend one of the following: Aviation, Clipper Ship, Cloister, Jasmine, Last Word, Pegu, and Petruchio as a start.

TheBalch 28 Jan 2012
1:38 am

Hi Mr. Hess,

I’ve noticed that you sometimes fill the mixing glass to the top with ice, while other times you don’t. Is that deliberate? I assumed that more ice means less melting, which would affect the dilution of the alcoholic ingredients.

Robert Hess 28 Jan 2012
11:07 am

Caught in the act. It’s not specifically intentional when I over-ice in the mixing glass, and frankly it’s something I should probably pay more attention to. The key is to make sure you get “enough” ice that the ice isn’t “struggling” to impart its chill into the drink. In this particular case, I don’t think I used quite enough ice.

-Robert

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